Tin Can Monster Feet DIY

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martha-stewart-kids-crafts

This month when I opened my 12 Months of Martha box I let out an audible “HOORAY!!!” I had heard about the new book Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids and I really, really wanted it. Really really. So when I opened the box and saw it sitting there I felt like a pretty lucky little duck.

We were asked to check out the book and recreate one of the crafts. Some tin can elephant feet immediately caught my eye. I was asked by Babble to create some Monsters U inspired games, and I thought, “HA! I can kill two blogging birds with one stone! AND have Gigi think I’m the coolest mom on the block.” And I did, and I am. So I made some Tin Can Monster Feet. I’ll be sharing how I used them at a Monster Party a little later on this week! But here’s a preview…

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This craft and activity is really better suited for older kids, I’d say probably ages 6-8 are ideal. The younger kids really really liked trying to walk on the tin cans, but they needed a bit of help. If you do this activity for younger kids you should probably just make it yourself before the party or gathering. But older kids would probably really enjoy painting their own tin! And then you could have monster feet races.

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HOW TO MAKE THE TIN CAN MONSTER FEET:

I used two clean 20oz ish tin cans. But your standard 15oz can would work just great. I bought parachute cord at Joann, but any sturdy string would do.

I opened and cleaned my cans (they had enchilada sauce, and I used it to make the best pork!). Then I used a nail and hammer to punch holes in the sides of the tin. *NOTE Make your holes near the unopened end of the tin. DUH, I made them in the wrong place at first. My holes weren’t quite big enough so I used a screwdriver to pound the holes a bit wider. I tried doing this process with my drill but it didn’t work too well. Martha recommends using a key hole can opener, but I don’t have one! That would probably be easiest.

Next I spray painted the tins white. But like I said, you could let older kids paint their own tins! Acrylic paint will work, but the spray paint will give you the best-looking allover color, if that’s what you want. (Yeah I tried both methods, sue me.)

After the tin was painted I threaded the parachute cord through the holes. I left it really long because I wasn’t sure how much cord the kids would need. Probably about 3 feet on either end of the tin.

I used Martha Stewart foam pouncers and some of her acrylic paint to (both goodies from previous boxes) to create the toes. For the toenails I just used a permanent marker once the paint was dry.

I OBVIOUSLY had the faux fur on hand, and I just hot glued that on. You can find faux fur fabric by the yard at a store like Joann or Wal-Mart, but here’s a tip, look for it in the remnants bin first! They usually have some and everything in the bin is 50% off. You don’t need that much so this is a good way to go. I make it a habit to check every remnant bin for faux fur, pleather and anything shiny when I’m in a fabric store. I can’t help it. It’s like a disease. Help?

And there you have it! Super cute, super fun tin can monster feet in under an hour.

Hip hip hooray!

xo,
Alison

Comments

  1. Tania:

    Hi Alison!

    Let me start by saying I love your blog and I also love your personality! And like you, I also think you are funny hehe.
    I have a question related to one of your areas of expertise, faux fur. Do you know of a place either in SLC or around P town that might sell fur of colors other than black or white? Let’s say maybe green? I want to make a faux fur monster for my baby boy’s party and didn’t have to order it online, but will do if I have to. Thanks in advance! =)

  2. Pingback: Super cute fuzzy tin can monster feet from The Alison Show…. | DIY Glory

  3. Jay:

    For a great selection of faux furs and other costume-type fabrics, try http://www.distinctivefabric.com/. I have been VERY pleased with my purchases from there.

    For small amounts of faux-fur, you might also consider recycling old stuffed toys. Almost anyone with a child is stuck with one or more huge stuffed animals (from well-meaning relatives) gathering dust in a corner. Often thift stores will be stuck with them. too (although most won’t accept them anymore and just dumpster those that are left there). Just wash/dry them in a pillowcase and most fur will come out just fine for this kind of craft.

    If you are stuck with a surfiet of small (beanie baby-style) toys, consider cleaning them and sending them to the overseas troops. I have ready that many soldiers on good-will missions keep pocket-zied toys to give away to local children..

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